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Selling for a living in the twenty-first century requires coming to terms with a dizzying array of interconnected, hard-to-anticipate changes in the areas of technology, marketplace trends, and client agendas. Falling behind in any one of these areas means losing relevance and with it, your competitive edge. Here are three simple things you can to do make sure you stay up-to-date and relevant in the world of your ideal buyer.

In our book THE SUCCESS CADENCE, Tom Schodorf, Bart Fanelli and I ask these questions: How can leaders scale aggressive sales growth consistently? How can they achieve rapid, dramatic growth in their company? How can they sustain that growth over time? The aggressive, sustainable growth so many company leaders seek, but few can actually point to,…

Very often, managers who lead sales teams find themselves saying something like the following: “I have told them how to do X a hundred times, and it never seems to stick. I just don’t know what their problem is.” Or these managers may find themselves thinking, “Maybe I just hired the wrong person.” Very often, managers who lead sales teams find themselves saying something like the following: “I have told them how to do X a hundred times, and it never seems to stick. I just don’t know what their problem is.” Or these managers may find themselves thinking, “Maybe I just hired the wrong person.”

When it comes to the technology we can use to make our day easier, we live in an era of astonishing, intimidating variety. Sometimes it seems there are just way too many options! It’s easy to become infatuated with a new, cutting-edge application… but we should think twice before we make a permanent commitment to a new piece of technology. Before we invest precious resources like time, finances, and our team’s attention on implementing a particular software application, we should consider the following questions closely.

At many of the organizations we work with, the size of the average sales team has increased over the past decade. Given that there are a limited number of working hours, and given that sales leaders now find themselves responsible for supervising, training, mentoring, and coaching larger teams, what best practices should they embrace when it comes to time management? Here are three to consider. 

Three Ways to Use Technology to Support Your Sales Process.jpeg

This is a truly amazing period of history for sales professionals. The information tools that help us to identify, connect with, and sustain ongoing relationships with buyers are more powerful than ever, and they allow us to do things few could have imagined just a few years ago. But there's a challenge we all face: We mustn't let the extraordinary technology we now have blind us to the importance of having a clear sales process.

Three Reasons to Set and Follow a Behavioral Plan.jpeg

What is the ideal mix of daily and weekly activities – the mix that best supports our income goals? We should know. If we have a personalized daily “recipe” for daily and weekly progress toward key activity benchmarks, also known as cookbook or a behavioral plan, we can identify exactly how many dials we need to make, how many conversations we need to have, how many referrals we need to ask for, and so on… every single working day.

Four Goal Setting Habits of Effective Leaders Image

The first month of the year is a classic time for sales professionals to focus with intensity on identifying and fulfilling their most important personal and organizational goals. We’ve noticed, though, that the goal setting behavior of an organization’s leaders during the month of January tends to have the biggest bottom-line impact on the year as a whole.

Five Ways to Invest in Employee Development Image

Most of us who lead teams and organizations readily acknowledge that we should be doing more to invest in the personal and professional development of the people who report to us. We have a lot of responsibilities, we get busy, and, all too often, we don’t take action on this essential priority.

With Q4 upon us, it makes sense to start thinking carefully about what has worked – and what could be improved – in your prospecting plan this year.