Skip to main content

Of the corporate blind spots shared in The Road to Excellencenot sharing the vision with those who have to implement it” is one of the most detrimental to the sustained growth of an organization. To create buy-in with your team (aka “those who will have to implement it”) share your vision in the form of questions instead of statements.

How to Succeed at Trials and Demos | Sandler Training | Franchise

Trials and demos can be an important part of your sales cycle, especially in the enterprise space, but as one long term Sandler client is “don’t unintentionally lengthen your sales cycle.” If your buyer wants to buy and you’ve properly qualified them close the sale instead of pushing back closing, and opening yourself up to your sale going sideways, but offering a trial that wasn’t requested.

How to Succeed at Trials and Demos | Sandler Training | Franchise

Trials and demos can be an important part of your sales cycle, especially in the enterprise space, but as one long term Sandler client is “don’t unintentionally lengthen your sales cycle.” If your buyer wants to buy and you’ve properly qualified them close the sale instead of pushing back closing, and opening yourself up to your sale going sideways, but offering a trial that wasn’t requested.

Traditionally performance evaluations (or reviews) are a “check the box” exercise designed to appease HR. These evaluations typically come down to a “good kid” (you made your number / performed to expectations) or “bad kid” (you didn’t make your number) comment from a manager. 

Holding your people accountable is simple. In working with sales leaders around the world, accountability isn’t easy because those leaders possess one of three self-limiting beliefs that cripple their accountability program.

Role play is one of the best methods for developing your people, but salespeople loath role play and managers shy away from it, because it often becomes an exercise that leaves participants frustrated. Putting role play through the lens of David Sandler’s Success Triangle – attitude, behavior, and technique – both managers and salespeople could role play more effectively and increase both their role performance, outlook, and technique.

A leader’s only valuable is their time, which is too often wasted on activities that don’t generate a good return. A leader’s number one asset is their people, which are too often left to waste with no clarity around expected behavior or a path to advancement in their organization. To make the best use of their only valuable and achieve the greatest return on their number one asset, Sandler recommends a leader invest at least 50% of their time each week with their direct reports, splitting their time amongst the following four activities.

All salespeople with a small amount of experience have a 30-second commercial (a.k.a elevator pitch, popcorn introduction, etc.) down pat. And that’s the problem.

Many leaders, especially if they were promoted from within, struggle with performance management. Not because they are bad leaders, but because they easily slide back into “doing” instead of “leading”.

David Sandler said, “If you live a straight life in an unstraight world you’re going to get killed.” Yet salespeople get (metaphorically) killed daily by selling in a straight line.

Salespeople sell in a straight line when they are attached to the outcome of their interaction with their prospect, typically closing a sale, instead of being attached to the process of (dis)qualifying.