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selling behavior

The TACTIC: Don't commiserate. You are there to manage your own behavior and help your salespeople manage their behavior. Commiseration only leads to misery.

The TACTIC: Understand the process of failure and let it work.  If you have failed, and then learned why you failed, you are 99% closer to increased success.

The TACTIC: Know what you changed. If the change you made doesn’t work out, sit down and make sure that you really changed what you thought you did. Almost always you will find that what was changed isn’t what you intended.

The TACTIC: There are no bad prospects - only bad salespeople. How you view your prospects determines precisely how much money you will make.

The TACTIC: Never manage your numbers; manage your behavior (Part 2). Knowing what you are doing is the first step in changing what you are going to do in the future.

The TACTIC: Never manage your numbers; manage your behavior (Part 1). Since your sales volume is based on how you behave, manage your behavior instead of wasting time trying to manage anyone else’s behavior.

I made this statement about the fact that it's not what we sell that makes us different, it's how we sell it. Although he had heard that Sandler rule before, he was taken back and asked me to repeat it several times. What he began to understand was that to differentiate ourselves in selling situations we often look at the features and benefits of what we're selling. 

In his recent book, Change or Die, author Alan Deutschman claims that although we have the ability to change our behavior, we rarely do.  In fact, the odds are nine-to-one that when faced with a dire need to change, we won’t.  Most smokers who are presented with a wealth of scientific data on the dangers of tobacco do not quit smoking.  Our beliefs are what we feel in our gut and those beliefs are hard to change; we spent a lifetime developing and defending them.  This explains why providing information rarely changes how people think or act.

Most people have one thing in common: the desire to “do better.” Of course, “doing better” means different things to different people. For some salespeople, it means closing more sales. For others, it means closing bigger sales. And there are salespeople for whom it means working less hard…or simply working less. What does it mean for you?

Do you think it would be possible to actually sell more and sell more easily? Could you actually spend less time, money and energy on business development and enjoy more revenue and profit? When you stop trying to sell to everyone, you can actually invest time and effort to build real ideal client relationships with qualified prospects. You can work smarter instead of harder.